Ts'ovata Ensemble
Zemo Alvani

Ensemble Ts’ovata is one of Georgia’s most unique contemporary ensembles. Composed of Ts'ova-Tush women from Akhmet’a and Zemo Alvani, the group sings songs in the critically endangered Bats language.

 

Ensemble members at the time of recording:

Tsitsino Dingashvili; Lela Saginashvili; Asmat Longishvili; Meri Jikhoshvili

 

To hear more songs in the Bats language, visit the pages of Meri Jikhoshvili, Pat'ima Bartishvili and Nino Arindauli.

 

Visit UNESCO's Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. For more information on the Ts'ova-Tush, as well as other minority groups in the Caucasus, visit Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Nanalo
+ Song Info

This song is in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

 

+ Lyrics

Nanalo

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

/Chakh’in chakh’ lamzur vagana nana

Vese bedukha nanalo nana/

 

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

/Ts’qet’qo lamzura vagana nana

Vese bedukha nanalo nana/

 

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

/O lelinchoha lelana nana

Vese bedukha nanalo nana/

 

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

/Chakh’in cha’kh lamzur vagana nana

Vese bedukha nanalo nana/

 

Translation:

 

Nanalo

 

I wish I could, oh mother

See the beauty from afar

It’s all my fault

 

I wish I could too, oh mother

See the beauty once more

To walk in her footsteps

It’s all my fault

Spoken Text - Nanalo
+ Song Info

This song is in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Please visit UNESCO's Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush, and other minority groups in the Caucasus, read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

Nanalo

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

/Chakh’in chakh’ lamzur vagana nana

Vese bedukha nanalo nana/

 

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

/Ts’qet’qo lamzura vagana nana

Vese bedukha nanalo nana/

 

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

/O lelinchoha lelana nana

Vese bedukha nanalo nana/

 

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

Madel mo baral nanalo nana

/Chakh’in cha’kh lamzur vagana nana

Vese bedukha nanalo nana/

 

Translation:

 

Nanalo

 

I wish I could, oh mother

See the beauty from afar

It’s all my fault

 

I wish I could too, oh mother

See the beauty once more

To walk in her footsteps

It’s all my fault

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Sen Dok'
+ Song Info

This song is in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

+ Lyrics

Sen Dok’

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Dak’akh harcheso dardia

Mohe lamukha k’urelcha

Are vadeln da se qopna

Qahesh datkh ese pikria

 

Le mokh’ tso khats’so michmerna

Le delar tsohani khats’so

Osht’i ia osht’i naghvela

Qahe dak’levar kh’echsokha

 

Ukhk’ch’irbal he sik’etekha

Ven dahucharla arch’isha

Vun dak’ tsodelil –

Delar undak’dal –

 

Dahkhetsal dak’an maqlibal

Khilhal sharn mohe leitsa

Dardgorenae datkhrekha

T’iripa kast’e matkharla

 

Translation:

 

My Heart

 

Grief is in my heart

Like the mountain fog

My existence is confused

My thoughts are crying

 

I don’t understand song

I don’t understand laughter

Again and again I grieve

I have bitter thoughts

 

I wonder, what plagues your kindness?

Why has it darkened, become black?

Why does no one laugh, no one?

--

 

I let go of my heart

Let it be how she wants it

A willow will soon fade

From weeping out of grief

Spoken Text - Sen Dok'
+ Song Info

This song, ''My Heart,'' is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Please visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

Sen Dok’

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Dak’akh harcheso dardia

Mohe lamukha k’urelcha

Are vadeln da se qopna

Qahesh datkh ese pikria

 

Le mokh’ tso khats’so michmerna

Le delar tsohani khats’so

Osht’i ia osht’i naghvela

Qahe dak’levar kh’echsokha

 

Ukhk’ch’irbal he sik’etekha

Ven dahucharla arch’isha

Vun dak’ tsodelil –

Delar undak’dal –

 

Dahkhetsal dak’an maqlibal

Khilhal sharn mohe leitsa

Dardgorenae datkhrekha

T’iripa kast’e matkharla

 

Translation:

 

My Heart

 

Grief is in my heart

Like the mountain fog

My existence is confused

My thoughts are crying

 

I don’t understand song

I don’t understand laughter

Again and again I grieve

I have bitter thoughts

 

I wonder, what plagues your kindness?

Why has it darkened, become black?

Why does no one laugh, no one?

--

 

I let go of my heart

Let it be how she wants it

A willow will soon fade

From weeping out of grief

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Molui Lamzuria Tushita
+ Song Info

This song is in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

 

+ Lyrics

Molui Lamzuria Tushita

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Molui lamzuria tushita

Lamu lasharob dagana

Mhaui uiap’incho tabniga

Santlev hak’ daha martsana

 

Hakh’ar maiva ieg melhar

Shishkhina dara ts’odiva

Garmon mak t’ark’i lap’ts’iara

Iahova shina t’ot’iva

 

Mts’k’rive mak chua khabzhena

Jer vaser kh’ena pst’ialo

Kh’evberna lemzrad dughina

Alznena pts’eli khialo

 

Molui lamzuria tushita

Lamu lasharob dagana

Mhaui uiap’incho tabniga

Santlev hak’ daha martsana

 

Translation:

 

How beautiful is Tusheti1

And the Tushetian Lasharoba2

And the candle lit on the sheep’s forehead

Before it is sacrificed.

 

Beautiful good women and men

Standing in a line by the ravine

Singing by the wild waters

Of the Alazani3

 

Drinking cold beer from the horn of a wild goat4

The sound of mts’vadi5 roasting on a fire

Dancing to songs played on the garmoni6

Played by the fingers of a Tush woman

 

Sometimes another verse is sung in this song:

 

Even through closed eyes

You can see the necks of the horses in the doghi

And birds dancing a round dance

And the shepherd boys with their wolf-like knees.

 

 

1A highland in northeast Georgia. The ancestral home of the Tush people. Read more about Tusheti here.

 

2Also referred to as Lashari's Cross, a sanctuary to Saint George of Lashari.  Located in the northeast highland of Pshavi and famous throughout Georgia, the mountaintop shrine used to be the political and religious center for Pshavs. The festivals of Lasharoba and Tamaroba (the latter referring to Lashari's sister shrine at Tamar-Ghele) are still celebrated every July throughout the northeast highlands.  

 

In his publication ''The Political Symbolism of the Mid-Summer Festival in Pshavi (Northeast Georgian Highland), Then and Now'' Kevin Tuite says of Lashari and Tamar, ''These supernatural siblings take their names from historical personages who were, in fact, mother and son: Queen Tamar (reigned 1184-1215) and her son and successor George IV, known as Lashar Giorgi (reigned 1215-1222).''  

 

3The Andi Koysu River, referred to here as Tusheti's Alazani, needs to be differentiated from the Alazani River that flows through K'akheti, Georgia. The Tushetian river flows north of the Caucasus watershed into Dagestan, eventually running into the Sulak River which ends in the Caspian Sea.

 

4The horns of the wild goat are traditionally hollowed out and used as drinking vessels when special toasts are made at feasts. 

 

5A traditional food in Georgia, specifically in the east: Pieces of pork roasted over the fire on spits, served sometimes with raw onion and pomegranate (shish kebab / shashlik)

 

6A button accordion that originated in Russia and plays an important role in the musical tradition of the Tush in Georgia, as well as in other regions throughout the Caucasus. Read more about the garmoni here

Spoken Text - Molui Lamzuria Tushita
+ Song Info

This song about Tusheti is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

Molui Lamzuria Tushita

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Molui lamzuria tushita

Lamu lasharob dagana

Mhaui uiap’incho tabniga

Santlev hak’ daha martsana

 

Hakh’ar maiva ieg melhar

Shishkhina dara ts’odiva

Garmon mak t’ark’i lap’ts’iara

Iahova shina t’ot’iva

 

Mts’k’rive mak chua khabzhena

Jer vaser kh’ena pst’ialo

Kh’evberna lemzrad dughina

Alznena pts’eli khialo

 

Molui lamzuria tushita

Lamu lasharob dagana

Mhaui uiap’incho tabniga

Santlev hak’ daha martsana

 

Translation:

 

How beautiful is Tusheti1

And the Tushetian Lasharoba2

And the candle lit on the sheep’s forehead

Before it is sacrificed.

 

Beautiful good women and men

Standing in a line by the ravine

Singing by the wild waters

Of the Alazani3

 

Drinking cold beer from the horn of a wild goat4

The sound of mts’vadi5 roasting on a fire

Dancing to songs played on the garmoni6

Played by the fingers of a Tush woman

 

Sometimes another verse is sung in this song:

 

Even through closed eyes

You can see the necks of the horses in the doghi

And birds dancing a round dance

And the shepherd boys with their wolf-like knees.

 

 

1A highland in northeast Georgia. The ancestral home of the Tush people. Read more about Tusheti here.

 

2Also referred to as Lashari's Cross, a sanctuary to Saint George of Lashari.  Located in the northeast highland of Pshavi and famous throughout Georgia, the mountaintop shrine used to be the political and religious center for Pshavs. The festivals of Lasharoba and Tamaroba (the latter referring to Lashari's sister shrine at Tamar-Ghele) are still celebrated every July throughout the northeast highlands.  

 

In his publication ''The Political Symbolism of the Mid-Summer Festival in Pshavi (Northeast Georgian Highland), Then and Now'' Kevin Tuite says of Lashari and Tamar, ''These supernatural siblings take their names from historical personages who were, in fact, mother and son: Queen Tamar (reigned 1184-1215) and her son and successor George IV, known as Lashar Giorgi (reigned 1215-1222).''  

 

3The Andi Koysu River, referred to here as Tusheti's Alazani, needs to be differentiated from the Alazani River that flows through K'akheti, Georgia. The Tushetian river flows north of the Caucasus watershed into Dagestan, eventually running into the Sulak River which ends in the Caspian Sea.

 

4The horns of the wild goat are traditionally hollowed out and used as drinking vessels when special toasts are made at feasts. 

 

5A traditional food in Georgia, specifically in the east: Pieces of pork roasted over the fire on spits, served sometimes with raw onion and pomegranate (shish kebab / shashlik)

 

6A button accordion that originated in Russia and plays an important role in the musical tradition of the Tush in Georgia, as well as in other regions throughout the Caucasus. Read more about the garmoni here

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Khen Dzire Dalhen Ia
+ Song Info

This song, ''I Am A Pretty Little Violet,'' (poetry by Ts'ova-Tush poet Ioseb Longishvili) is in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

 

+ Lyrics

Khen Dzire Dalhen Ia

Text: Ioseb Longishvili

(scroll down for English translation)

 

K’ats’k’o taguina ia das

Khendzire halo dalheno

Delisha soda hech’vina

Lamzurch iahokha tarhleno

 

K’ats’k’o denola ia sogo

Lehsona matkhog hech’ana

Hal ma ekh’doles dekhoshokh

Sodaga deen peshk’ara

 

K’ats’k’o denola ia sogo

K’ast’e matkharlas iao

Han khea kh’elo daghguias

Vese bedukha t’ialo

 

K’ats’k’o taguina ia das

Khendzire halo dalheno

Delisha soda hech’vina

Lamzurch iahokha tarhleno 

 

Translation:

 

I Am A Pretty Little Violet

 

I am a pretty little violet

Blooming at the foot of a tree

Laughing here and there

Like a beautiful young girl

 

My life is short

I want to look at the sun

You, child who has come to see me

Please don't pick me!

 

My life is short

I will fade soon

Who knows if I am to grow again

Oh this wretched life!

 

I am a pretty little violet

Blooming at the foot of a tree

Laughing here and there

Like a beautiful young girl

Spoken Text - Khen Dzire Dalhen Ia
+ Song Info

This song, ''I Am A Beautiful Little Violet,'' (poetry by Ts'ova-Tush poet Ioseb Longishvili) is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Please visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

 

+ Lyrics

Khen Dzire Dalhen Ia

Text: Ioseb Longishvili

(scroll down for English translation)

 

K’ats’k’o taguina ia das

Khendzire halo dalheno

Delisha soda hech’vina

Lamzurch iahokha tarhleno

 

K’ats’k’o denola ia sogo

Lehsona matkhog hech’ana

Hal ma ekh’doles dekhoshokh

Sodaga deen peshk’ara

 

K’ats’k’o denola ia sogo

K’ast’e matkharlas iao

Han khea kh’elo daghguias

Vese bedukha t’ialo

 

K’ats’k’o taguina ia das

Khendzire halo dalheno

Delisha soda hech’vina

Lamzurch iahokha tarhleno 

 

Translation:

 

I Am A Pretty Little Violet

 

I am a pretty little violet

Blooming at the foot of a tree

Laughing here and there

Like a beautiful young girl

 

My life is short

I want to look at the sun

You, child who has come to see me

Please don't pick me!

 

My life is short

I will fade soon

Who knows if I am to grow again

Oh this wretched life!

 

I am a pretty little violet

Blooming at the foot of a tree

Laughing here and there

Like a beautiful young girl

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Datkhar
+ Song Info

This Tush crying song, collected by Joseph Jordania in Dartlo, Tusheti in 1987, was originally sung in Georgian. Ts'ovata Ensemble translated it into the Bats language to create the version we have here. 

 

+ Lyrics

Datkhar

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Doikh badera doikha

Nan dahlaial hogo

/Tshak’va mequitsahso

Hokh dahlaialosa/

 

Bader miche ditna

Nabada qalchagha

Le do michebitna

Bekmak dahilenoda

Leghoch’ miche itna

Bekmak dahilenoda

 

Bader as he donen

Arch’ich k’ekhemaka

Oghri mak kh’asoes

Hunakh dahekh’bosa

 

Chutso dogehsona

Ts’enina sania

Hal tso kh’asgehsona

He harch’i bhoark’ia

 

Translation:

 

Mother Wishes To Die

 

Go child, go

Mother wishes to die for you

You have left me all alone

I want to die in your place

 

Child, where did you leave your rucksack?

And your felt coat?

And what about the sheep?  

Where did you leave your shepherd staff?

 

Child, I will put a black saddle

Over your horse

And have it seek you

In the forest and the fields

 

No longer will I walk

Through the threshold of home

No longer will your black eyes 

Shine upon me

Spoken Text - Datkhar
+ Song Info

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites this Tush mourning poem in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

Visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

Datkhar

(scroll down for English translation)
 

Doikh badera doikha

Nan dahlaial hogo

Tshak’va mequitsahso

Hokh dahlaialosa

 

Bader miche ditna

Nabada qalchagha

Le do michebitna

Leghoch’ miche itna

Bekmak dahilenoda

 

Bader as he donen

Arch’ich k’ekhemaka

Oghri mak kh’asoes

Hunakh dahekh’bosa

 

Chutso dogehsona

Ts’enina sania

Hal tso kh’asgehsona

He harch’i bhoark’ia

 

Translation:

 

Mother Wishes To Die

 

Go child, go

Mother wishes to die for you

You have left me all alone

I want to die in your place

 

Child, where did you leave your rucksack?

And your felt coat?

And what about the sheep?  

Where did you leave your shepherd staff?

 

Child, I will put a black saddle

Over your horse

And have it seek you

In the forest and the fields

 

No longer will I walk

Through the threshold of home

No longer will your black eyes 

Shine upon me

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Gazapkhula
+ Song Info

This love song called ''Spring'' is in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

+ Lyrics

Gazapkhula

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Gazapkhula iah bubk’ana buta

So t’qo hadaso daqdalin potol

Honen mokh’boa tseha mertskhliva

Sonen dugdugdo kotialinch alznev

 

Chakh’in chakh’dave dak’mia chakh’da

Mohak’a lakhol ve dak’miv vats’ba

Vashba deets’incho ak’uich nap’erts’k’lev

Eq metkhemaka ho gulbalaso

 

Ho ma tsokhea se dak’ilats’ar

Tso kheho sena sinadughara

So tso alhmak’ hog sona iets’eho

Sokh bed bots’bali isht’u khetrvrena

 

Translation:

 

Spring

 

Spring is the month of flowers

I am winter, a dried leaf

Swallows sing for you in the sky

For me, the troubled Alazani1 roars

 

We are far from each other, our hearts too 

How do we bring them together?

When we love each other, sparks alight

You are my soulmate in this world

 

You don’t know my heart’s pain

You don’t know my soul’s call

I can’t tell you that I love you

Fate has made me so complacent

 

1The Andi Koysu River, referred to here as Tusheti's Alazani, needs to be differentiated from the Alazani River that flows through K'akheti, Georgia. The Tushetian river flows north of the Caucasus watershed into Dagestan, eventually running into the Sulak River which ends in the Caspian Sea.

Spoken Text - Gazapkhula
+ Song Info

This love song called ''Spring'' is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

Gazapkhula

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Gazapkhula iah bubk’ana buta

So t’qo hadaso daqdalin potol

Honen mokh’boa tseha mertskhliva

Sonen dugdugdo kotialinch alznev

 

Chakh’in chakh’dave dak’mia chakh’da

Mohak’a lakhol ve dak’miv vats’ba

Vashba deets’incho ak’uich nap’erts’k’lev

Eq metkhemaka ho gulbalaso

 

Ho ma tsokhea se dak’ilats’ar

Tso kheho sena sinadughara

So tso alhmak’ hog sona iets’eho

Sokh bed bots’bali isht’u khetrvrena

 

Translation:

 

Spring

 

Spring is the month of flowers

I am winter, a dried leaf

Swallows sing for you in the sky

For me, the troubled Alazani1 roars

 

We are far from each other, our hearts too 

How do we bring them together?

When we love each other, sparks alight

You are my soulmate in this world

 

You don’t know my heart’s pain

You don’t know my soul’s call

I can’t tell you that I love you

Fate has made me so complacent

 

1The Andi Koysu River, referred to here as Tusheti's Alazani, needs to be differentiated from the Alazani River that flows through K'akheti, Georgia. The Tushetian river flows north of the Caucasus watershed into Dagestan, eventually running into the Sulak River which ends in the Caspian Sea.

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Batsburi Nanila
+ Song Info

This lullaby (poetry by Ts'ova-Tush poet Ioseb Longishvili) is in the severely endangered Bats language

 

 

+ Lyrics

Batsburi Nanila

Text: Ioseb Longishvili

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Nanai nanai nanai nanai nana

 

Chu tvihdis badera ak’vana nano

Asa terkdos nanasa nano

Maka iet’asa baqea nano

Mosi erche huh hamasa nano

 

Chu tvihdis bader chu tvihdis nano

Ghaze vets’es ho vaqvana nano

Sek’natakh ho telhina nano

Vardegu vets’es kho vagvana nano

 

Shilghe matkh halo belhsona nano

Aha nakhlo hagelcheha nano

Kortoe laqish latsbosa nano

Okh’vui vaeno elcheha nano

 

Translation:

 

Bats Lullaby

 

Sleep, child

Mother will rock you

I will whip anyone

Who says anything bad about you

 

Sleep child, sleep

You need to grow up well

You are better than the others

You need to look after yourself well

 

A second sun rises

When you enter a crowd

I shall hold myself proudly

When they speak about you

Spoken Text - Batsburi Nanila
+ Song Info

This lullaby (poetry by Ts'ova-Tush poet Ioseb Longishvili) is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

Batsburi Nanila

Text: Ioseb Longishvili

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Nanai nanai nanai nanai nana

 

Chu tvihdis badera ak’vana nano

Asa terkdos nanasa nano

Maka iet’asa baqea nano

Mosi erche huh hamasa nano

 

Chu tvihdis bader chu tvihdis nano

Ghaze vets’es ho vaqvana nano

Sek’natakh ho telhina nano

Vardegu vets’es kho vagvana nano

 

Shilghe matkh halo belhsona nano

Aha nakhlo hagelcheha nano

Kortoe laqish latsbosa nano

Okh’vui vaeno elcheha nano

 

Translation:

 

Bats Lullaby

 

Sleep, child

Mother will rock you

I will whip anyone

Who says anything bad about you

 

Sleep child, sleep

You need to grow up well

You are better than the others

You need to look after yourself well

 

A second sun rises

When you enter a crowd

I shall hold myself proudly

When they speak about you

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Dets'arvets'ri
+ Song Info

This love song is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

 

+ Lyrics

Dets’arvets’ri

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Hoits’i se denol ukhak’ial

Matkh tso gush mohak’ iakhlosa

Dah ghorios halikh pshelova

Dah ghorios lavav ghoruva

 

Hots’i se niqav ukh khilul

Bark’its’I hech’ar han alhi

Se bhark’a denol ho iaho

Mohe metkhemak e matkha

 

Hots’i sadukhak’ moh dakhlos

Se haera ho iaho

Dacho he khats’so kh’eichotso

Metkhemak dacho he dets’os

 

Translation:

 

Without you, my life

How can I live without the sun?

I will freeze in the cold winter

The snow and the streams numb me

 

Without you, I wonder what my road will be

For without eyes, who can see?

In my eyes, you are life

As the sun is life to the land

 

I wonder how I could breathe without you

Because you are my air

No one else hears you but me

In the whole world, only I will believe you

Spoken Text - Dets'arvets'ri
+ Song Info

This love song is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

Dets’arvets’ri

(scroll down for English translation)
 

Hoits’i se denol ukhak’ial

Matkh tso gush mohak’ iakhlosa

Dah ghorios halikh pshelova

Dah ghorios lavav ghoruva

 

Hots’i se niqav ukh khilul

Bark’its’I hech’ar han alhi

Se bhark’a denol ho iaho

Mohe metkhemak e matkha

 

Hots’i sadukhak’ moh dakhlos

Se haera ho iaho

Dacho he khats’so kh’eichotso

Metkhemak dacho he dets’os

 

Translation:

 

Without you, my life

How can I live without the sun?

I will freeze in the cold winter

The snow and the streams numb me

 

Without you, I wonder what my road will be

For without eyes, who can see?

In my eyes, you are life

As the sun is life to the land

 

I wonder how I could breathe without you

Because you are my air

No one else hears you but me

In the whole world, only I will believe you

Ts'ovata Ensemble - Vet Vaikh
+ Song Info

This song is sung in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

 

+ Lyrics

Vet Vaikh

(scroll down for English translation)
 

Metkherna shvina ghotvea

Tsodagh getvea eseva

Ven denol chutsoi toie

Dugh dak’rev datkhrev k’vneseva

 

Vet vaikh…

 

Sik’vdleva hatkha lakhk’otve

Akh hamur barts’av zhesana

Arch’ich uchkhana dokhk’otve

Tsikhe dhep’dien t’qvesana

 

Dina ditletkho dalelo

K’adzik’a atas sharea

Khk’ulikha loma kh’elatkho

Alin dakhitletkh bareha

 

Translation:

 

We Are Forlorn

 

We will leave this world

And no longer return

We can’t leave our life behind

Without weaping, screaming and groaning

 

We are forlorn...

 

Death gathers us ahead

Deep in the night like a wolf with sheep

Pouring us into darkness

Like captives in a cell

 

We are forlorn...

 

God let us live

At least for a thousand years

In summer we will take to the mountains

And in winter we live in the plains1

 

We are forlorn...

 

1Tush people spend their summers in the highland of Tusheti, returning to the lowlands for the winter.  

Spoken Text - Vet Vaikh
+ Song Info

This song is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili reads the poem.

 

Visit UNESCO’s Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova Tush, and other minority groups in the Caucasus, read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

Vet Vaikh

(scroll down for English translation)

 

Metkherna shvina ghotvea

Tsodagh getvea eseva

Ven denol chutsoi toie

Dugh dak’rev datkhrev k’vneseva

 

Vet vaikh…

 

Sik’vdleva hatkha lakhk’otve

Akh hamur barts’av zhesana

Arch’ich uchkhana dokhk’otve

Tsikhe dhep’dien t’qvesana

 

Dina ditletkho dalelo

K’adzik’a atas sharea

Khk’ulikha loma kh’elatkho

Alin dakhitletkh bareha

 

Translation:

 

We Are Forlorn

 

We will leave this world

And no longer return

We can’t leave our life behind

Without weaping, screaming and groaning

 

We are forlorn...

 

Death gathers us ahead

Deep in the night like a wolf with sheep

Pouring us into darkness

Like captives in a cell

 

We are forlorn...

 

God let us live

At least for a thousand years

In summer we will take to the mountains

And in winter we live in the plains1

 

We are forlorn...

 

1Tush people spend their summers in the highland of Tusheti, returning to the lowlands for the winter.  

Ts'ovata Ensemble - He Arch'i Bhark'i
+ Song Info

This love song is sung in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

+ Lyrics

He Arch’i Bhark’i

(scroll down for English translation)
 

He arch’i bhark’i ha itsoiu

Le t’qo qornena p’hania

Ho dah ambuiun bubuk’a

Ho dah samotkhe sania

 

Pkhauzt’qats’ tsoen elhcheha

Maints t’qo iets’so hoalo

Vai tkhaluna qonola

Vena tsokheish ghoalo

 

Hurde k’at’k’et’k’osh halikho

Hokh epkhetesha matkhalo

Ah so tso hech’che semakh’ish

Shine bark’eva datkhalo

 

Tsha dosh alhoshog lamzura

Ts’qeige ma its’o iakh’olo

Bumkheho kast’e matkharla

Qaqach hedaghin kh’avelo

 

Translation:

 

Your Black Eyes

 

Who can forget your black eyes

And your raven-colored wings

You are a flower which speaks

You are the gates of Heaven

 

If you refused me a thousand times

I would still love you

We can't possibly grasp yet

How our youth will someday leave us

 

In the morning slowly rises

Your timid sunlight

If you don't take my songs to heart

I will break into tears

 

Consider it, beautiful one

Don’t have too much pride

For the blossoming poppy in the cornfield

Soon will fade

Spoken Text - He Arch'i Bhark'i
+ Song Info

This love song is in the severely endangered Bats language.  

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

He Arch’i Bhark’i

(scroll down for English translation)

 

He arch’i bhark’i ha itsoiu

Le t’qo qornena p’hania

Ho dah ambuiun bubuk’a

Ho dah samotkhe sania

 

Pkhauzt’qats’ tsoen elhcheha

Maints t’qo iets’so hoalo

Vai tkhaluna qonola

Vena tsokheish ghoalo

 

Hurde k’at’k’et’k’osh halikho

Hokh epkhetesha matkhalo

Ah so tso hech’che semakh’ish

Shine bark’eva datkhalo

 

Tsha dosh alhoshog lamzura

Ts’qeige ma its’o iakh’olo

Bumkheho kast’e matkharla

Qaqach hedaghin kh’avelo

 

Translation:

 

Your Black Eyes

 

Who can forget your black eyes

And your raven-colored wings

You are a flower which speaks

You are the gates of Heaven

 

If you refused me a thousand times

I would still love you

We can't possibly grasp yet

How our youth will someday leave us

 

In the morning slowly rises

Your timid sunlight

If you don't take my songs to heart

I will break into tears

 

Consider it, beautiful one

Don’t have too much pride

For the blossoming poppy in the cornfield

Soon will fade

Ts'ovata Ensemble - But Dah Bedbali Met'ekherna Halobalhana
+ Song Info

This song is sung in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

 

+ Lyrics

There is no English translation available for this song. If you are able to provide one, please include it in an email to aurelia@tsutisopeli.com and we will update the page.

 

But Dah Hedbali Met’ekherna Halobalhana

 

But dah hedbali met’ekherna halobalhana

Metkha okrosper p’haniv sodah untso ot’ina

Tsen dah hopdali harch’i dokhk’a tkhaluch psarluina

Tkhaluch psarluna demon sana osht’i tshavevas

 

Ese nabiji soda tilhe ts’inap’ra bilk’ekh

Daha tarhlvalis udabnoha lelech matkhovrekh

Kiko khale se qonu ghelvi qonu dak’levar

Denish dat’in duit’ sok’i osht’i osht’i tshavevas

 

Un bets’so e mokh’ dot’uchkhango dah tso bisbelche

Tso habvichhes daghuch qonshiv mohe sakhsovar

Tsa dahlach’qiali tsego darou bakitsogua

Tkhaluch psarluina at’inch psarlun osht’i tshave vas

Spoken Text - But Dah Bedbali Met'ekherna Halobalhana
+ Song Info

This song is in the severely endangered Bats language.

 

Here in order for us to better hear the language, Meri Jikhoshvili recites the poem.

 

Please visit UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger to learn more about the Bats language. To learn more about the Ts’ova-Tush and other minority groups in the Caucasus read on at Batsav, an informative website created by A.J.T. Bainbridge.

+ Lyrics

But Dah Hedbali Met’ekherna Halobalhana

 

But dah hedbali met’ekherna halobalhana

Metkha okrosper p’haniv sodah untso ot’ina

Tsen dah hopdali harch’i dokhk’a tkhaluch psarluina

Tkhaluch psarluna demon sana osht’i tshavevas

 

Ese nabiji soda tilhe ts’inap’ra bilk’ekh

Daha tarhlvalis udabnoha lelech matkhovrekh

Kiko khale se qonu ghelvi qonu dak’levar

Denish dat’in duit’ sok’i osht’i osht’i tshavevas

 

Un bets’so e mokh’ dot’uchkhango dah tso bisbelche

Tso habvichhes daghuch qonshiv mohe sakhsovar

Tsa dahlach’qiali tsego darou bakitsogua

Tkhaluch psarluina at’inch psarlun osht’i tshave vas